01-20-18 Maze-ike Workshop With Jeanne Holy

The maze-ike shoka workshop was led by visiting professor from Illinois, Jeanne Holy.  Jeanne has been studing ikebana for 25 years in the United States and Japan.  For this workshop, she led the class in a maze-ike shoka.

The maze-ike shoka is a mixed arrangement.  Jeanne created two isshuike arrangements and then combined them into a maze-ike.   She explained that there are many materials that when used alone are somewhat weak for isshuike.  By combining two weaker materials together the arrangement becomes much stronger.   In the maze-ike arrangement, both materials have a yakueda or shin, soe, and tai which are separate in the kenzan.   So, even though two materials are used, this arrangement is like creating two isshuike instead of a nishuike.   The arranger should choose a ‘dominate’ material.  Ashirai can be used to strengthen a weaker material so it appears stronger.   The ‘mixed’ part of the arrangement refers to the upper part of the arrangement.  Even though the material is separated in the kenzan, the materials ‘mix’ in the upper part.

Yuki Kataoka

Yuki Kataoka

Yoly Hughson

Yoly Hughson

Wanda LaLoggia

Wanda LaLoggia

Toby Schmich

Toby Schmich

Shelly Dessen

Shelly Dessen

Sandy Rosen

Sandy Rosen

Naomi Matusow

Naomi Matusow

Michele Nguyen

Michele Nguyen

Marylou Coffman

Marylou Coffman

Margaret Michel

Margaret Michel

Linnea Storm

Linnea Storm

Josephine Vincze

Josephine Vincze

Jeanne Holy

Jeanne Holy

Evie Norrins

Evie Norrins

Daira Legzdina

Daira Legzdina

Cathy Johnson

Cathy Johnson

Bev Tall

Bev Tall

Bev Huddleston

Bev Huddleston

Glossary

  • ashirai – additional lines of material that support or compliment a the parts
  • isshuike – traditional one material shoka arrangement
  • kenzan – similar to a pin frog; device with needles/pins to hold flowers.  It consists of a heavy lead plate with erected brass needles where the stipes are fixed
  • nishuike – traditional two material shoka arrangement
  • shin – the longest (main) branch, representing heaven (carries a weight of 7)
  • soe – the second longest branch, representing man or human (carries a weight of 5)
  • tai – smallest branch, representing earth (carries a weight of 3)
  • yakueda – principal parts or insertions of an arrangement, i.e. shin, soe, tai